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Cat stuck in a tree?

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It happens all the time. All cats are natural tree climbers, but when it is time to come down, some cats know how to climb down and some don’t. Those that don’t know how to come down are truly stuck. When the cat is stuck, the cat and its owner are both suffering, and that suffering is needlessly prolonged when numerous people convince the owner that all cats come down on their own. That is not true. Some cats will come down, but some won't. If the cat has had enough time to figure out how to come down on its own and is still stuck, then it's time for a rescue. All About Cats in Trees The subject of cats in trees is poorly understood by the general public, and I hope that the  Cats in Trees section will bring some much-needed clarity to the topic. I invite you to use the navigation links in the sidebar to explore this section where I share all that I have learned about cats in trees, such as why cats get stuck , what to do if you find a cat in a tree , how to coax a cat do

Camiko

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It was another one of those "Oh my goodness!" moments when I first saw where Camiko was perched in the tree. This one-and-a-half-year-old gray tabby girl appeared only as a dark spot about 65 feet high at the top of a skinny Sweetgum tree growing in the woods behind her home. From the looks of her precarious spot on tiny, uncomfortable limbs, I would normally expect a cat to fall out of the tree after one or two nights, but Camiko had been here for seven nights, and she was miserable. The tree looked more like a skinny pole, and I was pretty certain that it would not be safe to climb it high enough to rescue Camiko. I was somberly thinking about my extreme rescue options while hoping that Camiko would get excited enough to come down a bit to me. Climbing the last twenty feet of the tree went very slowly because I wanted to advance in small increments to judge how well the tree could handle my weight without excessive swaying. Fortunately, the tree felt stable with each advanc

Simon's Third Rescue

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Simon has an addiction to trees. He is only ten months old and has already been stuck in a tree six times. His family managed to rescue him themselves three of those times, and I rescued him the other three times. Before you get upset with the family for allowing this to happen, you need to understand that they are doing all they can to prevent this. They keep him inside all the time despite his persistent complaints, but he is adept at dashing out the door whenever he sees an opening. Once he gets outside, he heads for the trees. I love rescuing Simon because he is a lovable, sweet boy and is always happy to see me and as cooperative as he can be with me. This third time was no exception. All I need to do is climb up near him, and I can expect him to come as close as he can to meet me. We're friends without any introduction, and he lets me rescue him in whatever way I decide. This time, I needed him to walk into a carrier, and that's exactly what he did. He was only 25 feet hi

Oreo

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Oh my goodness! That was my reaction to seeing where Oreo was stuck in the tree when I arrived to rescue him. Oreo picked the worst spot to be stuck in this Cedar tree just behind his home where he escaped four days earlier. Cedar trees often have an oversized limb that grows outward and then curves vertically upward like a separate tree in its own right, and Oreo picked that limb and climbed to the tip top where he settled about 50 feet high. The limbs there were tiny, and his position was precarious. His body was draped at the belly over one of those tiny limbs, and his feet barely reached other limbs on opposite sides. If he extended his legs and pushed up, he could relieve some of the pressure of that tiny limb digging into his belly, but he could not maintain that position for long. Imagine being stuck in that position for ten minutes. Oreo was stuck there for four nights. I climbed up the trunk of the tree until I was roughly level with him. I leaned and stretched out till I was

Ellie, Missy, and Little Bit

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The cat rescue business has been strangely quiet the past few weeks, but I got several calls which, except for three, resolved without my intervention. The three rescues I did all are lacking in video and pictures because I failed to remember to turn on the camera. Two of the rescues were unusual because the cats were elderly, and the other one was for a cat I have already rescued twice before. First was Ellie, a twelve-year-old, brown tabby girl in Ponchatoula, Louisiana who had been stuck in a tree for four nights before her owners found me. After I installed my rope in the tree, she moved down a little bit and settled in a fork where a fallen, dead limb had come to rest, and that limb restricted both her movement and mine. She was a little nervous about me but tolerated me long enough for me to grab her by the scruff and bag her. She handled it very well and is quite happy to be back home again. Missy, in Denham Springs, Louisiana, is another elderly tabby girl who got stuck in a tr